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  #1  
Old 03-28-2012, 10:46 PM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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Default Survival Bread

I just made this survival bread recipe that has been floating around the internet for years:

Survival Bread
2 c. oats
2 c. powdered milk
3 oz pkg. Jell-O (orange or lemon)
3 T. honey
3 T. water
1 c. sugar
Combine oats, powdered milk and sugar. In a medium pan, mix: water, Jell-O and honey. Bring to a boil; add dry ingredients and mix well. (If the mix is too dry, add a small amount of water a teaspoon at a time). Shape dough into a loaf (about the size of a brick). Place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 for 15-20 minutes; cool. If you increased the recipe for multiple loaves you can place several at a time onto the cookie sheet for baking. Don't place them too close together.
Once the bread is baked remove from the cookie sheet and allow to cool completely. The bread can be wrapped whole in the foil for storage. This bread will keep indefinitely and each loaf is the daily nutrients for one adult.

My question is can I reduce the sugar? I licked the pan and about went into a sugar coma! I understand that the sugar is for energy, but it seems too much!
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2012, 11:17 PM
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s275hv s275hv is offline
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The sugar is also acting as a preservative, if you reduce the sugar you increase the risk of spoilage.
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:53 PM
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goodcarma goodcarma is offline
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I've never heard of this! Does it taste good?
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:42 AM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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I think it tastes like candy since there is sugar, honey, and also sugar in the jello packet.

I cut it into slices (though hard to do since it gets pretty hard after cooled), wrapped them in tinfoil and put them plastic sandwich bags. I'm going to put them in our 72 hr kits and see what they look like in 6 months.
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:45 AM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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Default Other simpler recipe - hard tack

Here is a recipe that just uses flour, water, salt. They've used this for centuries called hard tack. I think I'll try this for a no sugar option.

http://www.ehow.com/how_4820040_make...val-bread.html

Discover the expert in you.
How to Make Survival Bread

Survival bread, also known as hard tack, pilot bread, ship biscuit or sea bread, was used throughout history during wars, on long sea voyages and in other survival situations where an inexpensive food was needed that would keep indefinitely. Survival bread is still baked and eaten today by survivalists, hikers and campers who need a long-lasting food source that doesn't require refrigeration. Many bread ingredients, such as oil, sugar, butter and milk, significantly reduce the shelf life of bread. For the longest-lasting survival bread, follow a very simple recipe that uses only flour, salt and water.

Difficulty:
Moderately Easy

Instructions
Things You'll Need

Oven
Large mixing bowl
4 cups flour
4 teaspoons salt
Mixing spoon
Water
Rolling pin
Knife
Nail
Cookie sheet

1

Turn on the oven and preheat it to 400 degrees. Wash your hands thoroughly.
2

Pour 4 cups of flour and 4 teaspoons of salt into a mixing bowl. Mix them together with a spoon.
3

Add water to the flour and salt mixture, a little at a time, while you mix it by hand. The mixture should stick together but not to your hands or the rolling pin. The idea is to use as little water as possible to achieve this.
4

Roll out the dough with the rolling pin, shaping it into a large rectangle, until it's about 1/2 inch thick.
5

Cut the dough with the knife, creating squares that are 3-by-3 inches. Poke each square with a clean nail without punching completely through the dough, making a 4-by-4 pattern of holes. Repeat this hole pattern on the other side as well. The holes will enable you to break the bread easier once it's cooked.
6

Put the bread dough on an ungreased cookie sheet and place them in the oven. Bake the dough for 20 to 25 minutes. The edges of the bread should be lightly browned.
7

Wait until the bread is completely dry before removing it from the oven. Store the survival bread in a closed container away from moisture.

Tips & Warnings

You can substitute whole wheat flour for regular flour in this recipe.

Dry survival bread can get very hard, with a brick-like consistency. Dip the bread in beverages, top with spreads or add to soups for easier consumption.

Cook the survival bread for 15 minutes instead of 30 minutes to make the bread softer.
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  #6  
Old 03-29-2012, 10:00 AM
dteasdale dteasdale is offline
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I have never heard of this. How long does it store for? Is it good for years or just a few months? I would love to try it!!
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Old 03-29-2012, 10:13 AM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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Both recipes say it stores "indefinitely." I'm going to make some then check every 6 months.
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Old 03-30-2012, 09:52 PM
spanishforkmama spanishforkmama is offline
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I'd love to hear how it turns out. But I think it makes more sense to keep some boxes of crackers (graham and otherwise) in food storage. They have a long shelf life and are easy to rotate and will have a more familiar taste in an emergency.
It's interesting though- thanks for posting!
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Old 04-06-2012, 05:00 PM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spanishforkmama View Post
I'd love to hear how it turns out. But I think it makes more sense to keep some boxes of crackers (graham and otherwise) in food storage. They have a long shelf life and are easy to rotate and will have a more familiar taste in an emergency.
It's interesting though- thanks for posting!
How do you store the crackers? Just in individual ziploc bags? I have crackers for short term storage but this survival bread idea is for 72 hr kits.
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  #10  
Old 04-12-2012, 05:33 PM
spanishforkmama spanishforkmama is offline
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Maybe for 72 hour kits granola bars or power bars would be a better choice. Or you could use a food saver to seal closed some crackers for your 72 hour kit, or buy the crackers and cheese packets. I really think that the survival bread is going to be pretty bland, and REALLY lacking in nutrition- a granola bar would taste familiar and provide more energy.

Like I said before- if someone makes this recipe and then eats it I would love to hear what they think- I haven't ever tried it. I'm just guessing from the ingredient list, and the life span, that it isn't made to be good- but durable.
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