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  #11  
Old 12-07-2006, 08:18 AM
bball-mama bball-mama is offline
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Default Another idea

I used to live in South Dakota where they can have pretty brutal blizzards. One idea for something to keep in your car is this:
empty coffee can, roll of toilet paper, bottle of rubbing alcohol and matches. You just stick the tp in the can, pour the alcohol over it and light it. A family from my church was stuck in a blizzard and this kept them warm and burned for hours.
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  #12  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:32 AM
lynclarke lynclarke is offline
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You might want to look in the "shovel for your car" thread. We got off on discussing items for your car in the winter.
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2008, 10:49 PM
junipertrailin junipertrailin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bball-mama
I used to live in South Dakota where they can have pretty brutal blizzards. One idea for something to keep in your car is this:
empty coffee can, roll of toilet paper, bottle of rubbing alcohol and matches. You just stick the tp in the can, pour the alcohol over it and light it. A family from my church was stuck in a blizzard and this kept them warm and burned for hours.
These are great. We made a whole box of them to keep in our car. It was fun for the kids to help make, we're giving them away as Christmas gifts next year. If you don't drink coffee, you can buy an empty paint can at Home depot for $1.xx and stick a roll of the free Scott Extra Soft TP in it. Just the right size!
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  #14  
Old 02-16-2008, 12:38 PM
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s275hv s275hv is offline
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I have been a little lax on getting my vehicles ready for winter. I figured it wasn't that big of deal. However, after the storm Wednesday in UT county that closed several of the highways I am rethinking this. I have a friend who lives in Eagle Mtn and her husband couldn't get home. He luckily had plenty of food, water and clothes and blankets in his car to wait it out while he was stuck on the road. However, I think several people weren't as lucky. I know I plan on putting together a plastic Tote with a blanket, some space blankets, food and water and some of these other items as well.
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  #15  
Old 02-16-2008, 03:06 PM
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mommyof4 mommyof4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s275hv
I have been a little lax on getting my vehicles ready for winter. I figured it wasn't that big of deal. However, after the storm Wednesday in UT county that closed several of the highways I am rethinking this. I have a friend who lives in Eagle Mtn and her husband couldn't get home. He luckily had plenty of food, water and clothes and blankets in his car to wait it out while he was stuck on the road. However, I think several people weren't as lucky. I know I plan on putting together a plastic Tote with a blanket, some space blankets, food and water and some of these other items as well.

I would suggest a deck of cards or book......even all by yourself you could at least play solitare or something. That storm reminded my why I try to keep my gas tank at least half full or higher.
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  #16  
Old 02-16-2008, 03:26 PM
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LazyBear LazyBear is offline
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Don't forget to put an extra Cell Phone charger in your vehicles.
Some of the people that were stuck had their cell batteries die on them.
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  #17  
Old 11-23-2008, 11:24 AM
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LazyBear LazyBear is offline
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Default Idaho drivers

Idaho State - http://www.isp.state.id.us/Winterdriving.html
(some of the links on that page do not work)

Travelers Info - http://511.idaho.gov/
Road Conditions - http://hb.511.idaho.gov/main.jsf


Your Car

Be prepared for the unexpected emergency...always carry a First Aid kit, map, ice scraper, snow brush, matches, candles, flashlight, warning triangles, flares, tow and battery jumping cables, folding shovel, a bag of sand, a blanket, winter gloves, cell phone if you have one, and an emergency HELP sign that you can put in the back window if you need help.

A blanket is a good idea--just in case. If you have any winter clothes you don't wear anymore, especially an old pair of boots, throw them in the trunk, too.

Keep all your car's windows, mirrors and lights clear of snow and ice.

Always keep the air intake grill free of snow and ice.

Take an extra minute to clear all the snow and ice from your car. This will help avoid sheets of ice flying off the car and hitting the car behind you. Check that headlamps, turn signals, and tail lights are unobstructed by snow and ice.

Clear off the entire car, not just a little peephole in the windshield. First of all, you need just as much, if not more, visibility in poor conditions, because you have to keep your eye peeled for every other knucklehead on the road. Make sure every glass surface is clear and transparent by using a snow brush and/or ice scraper. Your side view mirrors and all lights should be brushed and cleared as well.

Install snow tires on all four wheels. Never mix radial tires with other tire types.

Add gas line anti-freeze to the fuel-tank when refueling in extremely cold weather.

Get ready for harsh winter driving weather:

Keep gas tank always over half full.
In the winter, if you do get stuck or stranded, the engine will be your only source of heat. (And make sure you keep a window open a crack if you're sitting there with the engine running.

The other reason for a full tank is that warm daytime temperatures will fill the empty space in the tank with moisture, which will condense during the cold night. This water will sink to the bottom and, sooner or later, rust out your tank.

Make sure your windshield wipers are in good shape.

Check windshield washer fluid level.
On a snowy or messy day, you can easily go through quite a bit of fluid trying to keep your windshield clear. For that reason, it's also a good idea to keep some extra fluid in the trunk in case you run out. If you plan to travel in a very cold area, you also may need to supplement your windshield washer fluid with some concentrate.

Check engine oil, especially before long trips. Note that cars use more oil in the winter and as such check the oil level more often than you do in the summer. Use winter weight oil (5W-30).

Keep battery terminals clean, tight, free of corrosion and dry.

Check tire pressure, tire condition, and spare tire pressure regularly. Tires lose on the average 1 pound per month through normal leakage.

Carrying skis or snowboards? Load your roof rack according to manufacturer's specifications.

Have a mechanic check the battery, charging system and belts. If you find that you need a new battery, get the biggest, meanest, toughest battery that will fit in your car. Two things to remember about batteries: First, the battery that started your car easily in the summer may not have enough oomph to do it in winter, when the oil isn't as "fluid" as it was last July. And secondly, batteries lose power as the temperature drops. So, not only do you need MORE power to start the car in winter, you also get LESS power from the same battery.

Check coolant level and mixture
Make certain the antifreeze will protect your car to the winter temperatures you'll experience in your area. In the higher elevations of Idaho it often can drop to well below zero overnight. By the way, this is very important. If the stuff freezes, it expands, and it's bye-bye engine block.

If your coolant hasn't been changed in several years, get the cooling system flushed. The rust inhibitors in antifreeze break down over time and need to be renewed. Plus, draining out the coolant and refilling the system removes dirt and rust particles that can clog up the cooling system and cause problems in winter and summer.

Your Trip

Before beginning your trip, know the current road conditions and weather forecast.
For state-wide highway information 24-hours-a-day, check out

**********website*********

Road & Weather Reports for Idaho and the surrounding western states
You can also get information via phone at 1-888-IDA-ROAD (in the Treasure Valley call 336-6600)

Leave a few minutes early to allow extra time to get to your destination.

Do not drive when there are whiteouts, freezing rain or blizzards.

Restrain your dog. Travel harnesses are available in pet stores.
Don't forget to provide ventilation for your traveling pet.

Never drink and drive. Use a designated driver whenever possible.
Call a cab or a friend if you have been drinking.

Buckle up - always use your belt. This means all passengers and children, too.

Feeling tired? Pull off the road.

Normal Winter Driving Tips

Never warm up a vehicle in an enclosed area, such as a garage.
Carbon monoxide quickly builds up in enclosed areas and it cannot be sensed by your nose.

Always wear your safety belt. In Idaho, all children under 4 years or 40 pounds must be in an approved child safety seat.
(More information on seat belts & child restraints -
check out this website: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration - Buckle Up America!

Also - What does Idaho Law say about safety restraints?
Seat Belts Laws - http://www3.state.id.us/cgi-bin/newi...id=490060073.K
Child Restraints Law - http://www3.state.id.us/cgi-bin/newi...id=490060072.K

Start out slowly in the lowest gear recommended by your vehicle's manufacturer.

Watch for hazardous road conditions. Take extra care when driving on icy roads and watch out for hard to see patches of ice (black ice). Especially in shady spots and bridges.

Keep a safe distance of at least five seconds behind other vehicles and trucks that are plowing the road.

When there is snow on the ground and the sun is very bright - wear sunglasses to protect your eyes and prevent excessive eye fatigue.

Avoid driving when you are tired.

Always maintain a safe following distance between your car and the vehicle in front. It takes a greater distance to stop on ice and snow.

Don't pass a snowplow or spreader unless it is absolutely necessary.
Treat these as you would emergency response vehicles.

Always maintain a safe following distance between your car and the vehicle in front. It takes a greater distance to stop on ice and snow.

Every car has different handling characteristics. You should know what your car can and cannot do in the snow. You should know if it has antilock brakes and traction control, how they work and how they help. In fact, you should practice using these features in an empty parking lot before you have to use them on the roads. See your owner's manual for details.

When driving in the snow, do everything slowly. Even with good coolant, snow tires, traction control, all-wheel drive and the bag of pretzels in the trunk, keep in mind that driving in snow, sleet and ice is very treacherous. And even if you maintain control of your car, not everyone else will. So, don't ever get lulled into a false sense of security. Do everything slowly and gently. Remember, in the snow, the tires are always just barely grabbing the road. Accelerate slowly and gently, turn slowly and gently and brake slowly and gently. To do this, you have to anticipate turns and stops. That means, what? Going slowly and leaving plenty of distance between you and other cars. Rapid movements lead to skids and loss of control.

If you're nervous about driving in winter, consider spending some time practicing. Go to an empty parking lot and try sending the car into a little skid on purpose. Slam on the brakes, then practice turning into the skid and see what happens--and practice until you're comfortable regaining control of the car. Doing this in a large, empty parking lot allows you the luxury of skidding without ending up flat on your back, looking up into the eyes of several ambulance personnel and police. The more comfortable you are maintaining control and regaining control, the better a winter driver you'll be.

Drive economically - use a light foot on the accelerator pedal.



Driving In Extreme Low Visibility Winter Conditions

If you must go out when the conditions are poor, take a friend with you. Four
eyes are better than two anytime, and if you get yourself into trouble two people are usually better to find solutions rather than one.

When encountering whiteout, blizzard conditions or freezing rain - Slow down immediately ! Try to get off the highway to a safe area until the visibility and road conditions are better.

If you are on the interstate ..and your visibility is limited because of passing trucks, blowing snow, freezing rain, etc --- get off and drive slowly on a secondary road... They are a lot less hazardous and you can drive slowly without cramping any yahoo's style. You have no big trucks to contend with and if you do slide into a ditch...there are usually houses around where people are willing to let you use a telephone to call for help.

Turn on your four way flashers and proceed slowly with a lot of caution
Put on the window wipers and front and rear window defrosters

Watch the rear view mirror for vehicles who might rear end you.
Do not use high beams as they only reflect the snow and make it worse.

Watch for cars that might just suddenly appear in front of you. Roll down your window if you need to and listen for any cars coming!

Drive as if there were eggs on the bottom of your feet--step on the gas and the brake pedals so gently that you don't break the eggshell.

PLEASE BE CAREFUL!!!!


.
__________________
always have HOPE!!!
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  #18  
Old 12-01-2008, 11:15 AM
ProudParent ProudParent is offline
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My husband is a truck driver in Utah and I've found that states have road condition phone numbers. Here is Utah's. (or it might be Idaho's)

888-996-7623
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  #19  
Old 12-12-2008, 10:14 PM
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LazyBear LazyBear is offline
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Northern Utah

big storm system on the way, drive safely tomorrow and through the next week
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  #20  
Old 12-10-2009, 09:34 AM
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LazyBear LazyBear is offline
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Brrrrr!!! It's freezing outside!

Below zero temps.... yowsers!
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