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  #1  
Old 09-21-2006, 03:35 PM
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Post *Winter Weather Preparedness* current Road Condition links & tips

Utah Dept of Transportation - LINK

Utah's Commuter Link (view current road conditions) - http://commuterlink.utah.gov/ie.htm
Check there before traveling long distances.

Idaho Drivers check here - View Thread

____________________________________________

Tips to help you prepare for winter.

Why should you do it now?

As the temperature drops outside, there are things you need to do to prepare for harsh weather ahead.

Prepare your vehicle for winter:
Have your antifreeze & tires checked on your car.
Have a pressurized can of de-icer and tire inflate.
Make sure your spare is in good condition and full of air.
Check your car battery and wiper blades.
Keep battery jumper cables and towing strap in car at all times.
Kitty Litter for traction on icy areas.
Put a spare key behind your license plate or somewhere hidden, but accessible.
Check the tread on your tires.
Keep your gas tank full and a spare gas can in vehicle.
Have a vehicle first aid kit, blanket and emergency road side kit in your car.
Keep some non perishable foods in vehicle at all times during the winter - granola bars, jerky, gum, hard candy, crackers, nuts, etc.
Make sure you keep a lighter and fuel source or flare in your car at all times.
If you are going into the mountains- You can always light a tree on fire for heat and to aid in your rescue.

Prepare your house for winter:
Have your furnace and water heater checked. Replace filters and clean lint from around gas vents, air returns and heat registers. Check fan & motor belts and oil motor if necessary.
Remove combustibles from around furnace and water heaters.
Replace batteries in CO2 and Smoke detectors, test them too!
Turn off your sprinkler system and swamp cooler water supply.
Take care of the drafty areas around windows and doors.
Turn off outside water taps to prevent freezing.
Spray bugspray around foundation of house to prevent the creepy crawlers from finding a warm place to live during the winter.

Prepare your pets for winter:
Do they have proper shelter and water supplies that will not freeze over.
Will their food supply stay dry and not freeze.
Is their bedding adequate, do they need straw or a better house?

Here is a downloadable and printable checklist - Winter Storm preparedness

If you will be doing anything outdoors, you need to prepare for winter weather conditions. The temperatures will drop drastically in a matter of hours and hypothermia will set in rapidly. If you are stuck in the mountains and can't get to shelter or have improper clothing, you will be risking your life and safety.

Are you prepared?

Last edited by LazyBear; 11-23-2008 at 11:38 AM. Reason: updating thread
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  #2  
Old 11-28-2006, 07:50 PM
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Another thing to think about is to not let your car's gas tank go below half full. If you should get stuck somewhere in the snow, it's best to have at least half a tank so you can run your car and keep warm if necessary!
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  #3  
Old 11-28-2006, 08:02 PM
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Great idea!

I wouldn't want to walk through a blinding snowstorm either, just because I ran out of gas on the way to work. It's amazing how many people are in too big of a hurry in the morning to check the gas & oil gauges.
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Old 12-04-2006, 09:09 AM
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Default Triple AAA & Utah Highway Patrol safety tips:

Snow, rain and fog present real challenges to motorists, so Triple AAA & Utah Highway Patrol says drivers need to hone their winter driving skills to safely navigate the wet and slippery streets.

"The wet and snowy months of fall and winter have the highest number of crashes, and the most weather-related deaths and injuries," said AAA Utah spokeswoman Rolayne Fairclough.

Loss of visibility, slick roads, and poorly maintained vehicles combine with snow, rain, and fog to cause thousands of crashes each year. Motorists can improve their chances of safety if they observe a few winter-weather driving tips:

Adjust your driving for the weather.
Slow down. Your vehicle needs at least three times more distance to stop on slick roads. Increase your following distance to a minimum of four to eight seconds between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of you. Always be extremely attentive to your driving and the road conditions so you can anticipate a hazard in time to react safely.

Steer clear of collisions.
You may need to take evasive action to avoid a collision. Steering is preferred to braking at speeds above 25 mph because less distance is required to steer around an object than to brake to a stop. In winter weather, sudden braking often leads to skids.

Recognize a water hazard.
Even small amounts of moisture make a difference to your safety. Only one-twelfth of an inch of water between your tires and the road means each of your tires has to displace one gallon of water a second. To reduce the chances of hydroplaning, slow down, avoid hard braking or turning sharply, drive in the tracks of the vehicle ahead of you and increase your following distance.

Prepare your vehicle for winter driving.
Check the tread on your tires. Good tread allows the water to escape from under the tires and increases traction. Keep tires at proper pressure. Low pressure allows the tread to squeeze together and thus reduces traction. Make sure your lights work properly and change the blades in your wipers.

Know how to handle fog -
During winter months, fog often plagues Utah motorists. Visibility in fog can deteriorate at a moment's notice to as little as one-eighth of a mile or less. The rapid loss of visibility creates serious driving hazards. The following are specific driving tips for fog:

Drive with lights on low beam.
Reduce speed.
Listen for traffic you cannot see - open windows if necessary.
Use wipers and defroster for maximum vision.
Be patient! Don't switch lanes unnecessarily.
Unless absolutely necessary, don't stop on any freeway or other heavily traveled road.
If possible, postpone your trip until after the fog has lifted.
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Old 12-04-2006, 11:05 AM
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Default Department of Public Safety tips for Winter Preparedness

Click Here

Winter Preparedness Newsletter (450 KB download)
The National Weather Service (NWS), in partnership with the Utah Department
of Public Safety, Forest Service Utah Avalanche Center, Utah Department of
Transportation, the four Utah chapters of the American Red Cross, Utah State
Parks and Recreation, and the Utah State Board of Education welcome your
participation in this winter weather campaign.
Dozens of Americans die each year due to exposure to cold. Add to that,
vehicle accidents and related fatalities, plus billions of dollars in economic
losses, and it is clear that winter weather is a significant threat. The goals of
the campaign are to educate the citizens of Utah on winter’s hazards, to help
everyone be prepared before severe winter weather strikes, and to have an
understanding of winter weather terms and safety rules.
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  #6  
Old 12-04-2006, 11:31 AM
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Default Wind Chill Chart & Preparedness Plan

Wind Chill Chart

Winter Storms - the deceptive killer
Link for info below

Why Talk About Winter Weather?
• Each year, dozens of Americans die due to exposure to cold. Add to that number, vehicle accidents
and fatalities, fires due to dangerous use of heaters and other winter weather fatalities and you have
a significant threat.
• Threats, such as hypothermia and frostbite, can lead to loss of fingers and toes or cause permanent
kidney, pancreas and liver injury and even death. You must prepare properly to avoid these extreme
dangers. You also need to know what to do if you see symtoms of these threats.
• A major winter storm can last for several days and be accompanied by high winds, freezing rain or
sleet, heavy snowfall and cold temperatures.
• People can become trapped at home or in a car, without utilities or other assistance.
• Attempting to walk for help in a winter storm can be a deadly decision.
• The aftermath of a winter storm can have an impact on a community or region for days, weeks
or even months.
• Extremely cold temperatures, heavy snow and coastal flooding can cause hazardous conditions and hidden problems.

Wind Chill
Wind Chill is not the actual temperature but rather how wind and cold feel on exposed skin. As the wind increases, heat is carried away from the body at an accelerated rate, driving down the body temperature.
Animals are also affected by wind chill; however, cars, plants and other objects are not.

Frostbite is damage to body tissue caused by
extreme cold. A wind chill of -20° Fahrenheit (F) will
cause frostbite in just 30 minutes. Frostbite causes
a loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance in
extremities, such as fingers, toes, ear lobes or the tip
of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical
help immediately! If you must wait for help, slowly
rewarm affected areas. However, if the person is also
showing signs of hypothermia, warm the body core
before the extremities.

Hypothermia is a condition brought on when the
body temperature drops to less than 95°F. It can kill.
For those who survive, there are likely to be lasting
kidney, liver and pancreas problems. Warning signs
include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss,
disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech,
drowsiness and apparent exhaustion. Take the
person’s temperature. If below 95°F, seek medical
care immediately!

If Medical Care is Not Available-
Warm the person slowly, starting with the body core.
Warming the arms and legs first drives cold blood toward the heart and can lead to heart failure. If necessary, use your body heat to help.
Get the person into dry clothing and wrap in a warm blanket covering the head and neck.
Do not give the person alcohol, drugs, coffee or any hot beverage or food.
Warm broth is the first food to offer.

Dress for the Season
Wear loose, lightweight, warm clothes in layers. Trapped air insulates. Remove layers to avoid perspiration and subsequent chill. Outer garments should be tightly woven, water repellent, and hooded. Wear a hat. Half
your body heat loss can be from the head. Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extreme cold. Mittens, snug at the wrist, are better than gloves. Try to stay dry.

AVOID OVEREXERTION, such as shoveling heavy snow, pushing a car or walking
in deep snow. The strain from the cold and the hard labor may cause a heart attack. Sweating
could lead to a chill and hypothermia. Take Red Cross Cardiopulminary Rescue (CPR) and
Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training so you can respond quickly to an emergency.

Practice and maintain your Emergency plan.
Ensure your family knows meeting places, phone numbers and safety rules. Conduct drills.
Test your smoke alarms monthly and change the batteries at least once each year.
Test and recharge your fire extinguisher(s) according to manufacturer’s instructions.
Replace stored water and food every 6 months.
Contact your local National Weather Service office, American Red Cross chapter or emergency management
office for a copy of “Your Family Disaster Plan” (L-191/ARC4466).

• Portable radio
• Flashlight with extra batteries
• Extra set of car keys
• Cash and a credit card
• Special items for infant, elderly or disabled family members.
• One change of clothing and shoes per person

A 3-day supply of water (one gallon per person, per day)
• Food that won't spoil


Steps to Take

Prepare for hazards that affect your area with a Family Disaster Plan. Where will your family be when
disaster strikes? They could be anywhere at work, at school or in the car. How will you find each other?
Will you know if your children are safe? Disasters may force you to evacuate your neighborhood or confine
you to your home. What would you do if basic services – water, gas, electricity or telephones – were cut off?

Gather information about hazards. Contact your local National Weather Service office, emergency management
office, and American Red Cross chapter. Find out what type of disasters could occur and how you
should respond. Learn your community’s warning signals and evacuation plans. Assess your risks and
identify ways to make your home and property more secure.
Meet with your family to create a plan. Discuss your plan with your family. Pick two places to meet: a spot
outside your home for an emergency, such as fire, and a place away from your neighborhood in case
you can’t return home. Choose an out-of-state friend as your “family check-in contact” for everyone to
call if the family gets separated. Discuss what you would do if advised to evacuate.
Implement your plan.
1. Post emergency telephone numbers by the phone.
2. Install safety features in your home, such as smoke alarms and fire extinguishers.
3. Inspect your home for potential hazards (items that can move, fall, break or catch fire) and correct them.
4. Have your family learn basic safety measures, such as CPR, AED and first aid; how to use a fire
extinguisher; and how and when to turn off water, gas and electricity in your home.
5. Teach children how and when to call 911 or your local Emergency Medical Services number.
6. Keep enough supplies in your home for at least 3 days. Assemble a disaster supplies kit. Store
these supplies in sturdy, easy-to-carry containers, such as backpacks or duffle bags. Keep important
documents in a waterproof container. Keep a smaller disaster supplies kit in the trunk of your car.
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Old 12-04-2006, 11:43 AM
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Default Winter Health

Winter Health
Extreme cold temperatures pose a substantial danger during the winter months. Prolonged exposure to the cold can cause frostbite, hypothermia, or even death. Persons most susceptible to extreme cold are infants and the elderly.

Cold Weather Health Threats
Frostbite is a severe reaction to cold exposure of the skin that can permanently damage fingers, toes, the nose and ear lobes. Symptoms are loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance to the skin. If these symptoms are apparent, seek medical help immediately. If medical help is not immediately available, slowly re-warm the affected areas. If the victim is also showing signs of hypothermia, always warm the body core before the extremities (see below).

Hypothermia (Low Body Temperature)
is a condition brought on when the body temperature drops to less than 95°F. Symptoms include slow or slurred speech, incoherence, memory loss, disorientation, uncontrollable shivering, drowsiness, repeated stumbling and apparent exhaustion. If these symptoms are detected, take the person's temperature. If below 95°F, immediately seek medical help. If medical aid is not available, begin warming the person slowly. Always warm the body core/trunk first. If needed, use your own body heat to warm the victim. Get the person into dry clothing, and wrap them in a warm blanket, covering the head and neck. Do not give the person alcohol, drugs, coffee or any hot beverage or food; warm broth is better. Do not warm extremities (arms and legs) first. This drives the cold blood toward the heart and can lead to heart failure.

Winter Deaths
Everyone is potentially at risk, with the actual threat depending upon individual situations. Recent winter death statistics in the United States indicate the following:

Deaths related to ice and snow: About 70 percent occur in automobiles; 25 percent are people caught out in the storm; and the majority are males over 40 years old.

Deaths related to exposure to cold: 50 percent are people over 60 years old; over 75 percent are males; and about 20 percent occur in the home.

Recommended Winter Attire
Wear loose fitting, lightweight, warm clothing in several layers (the trapped air between the layers insulates). Layers can be removed to avoid perspiration and subsequent chill. Outer garments should be tightly woven, water repellent and hooded. Wear a hat (half of body heat is lost through the top of the head). Cover the mouth with scarves to protect lungs from cold air. Mittens, snug at the wrists, are better than gloves. Gloves allow your fingers to cool much faster than mittens do. Try to stay dry. Do not stay outside for extended periods!

Be Aware!
Cold weather puts a strain on your heart, even without exercise. Be careful when shoveling snow, pushing a car or performing other strenuous tasks. Regardless of your age or physical condition, avoid overexertion in the winter.
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Old 12-04-2006, 12:05 PM
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My windshield washer fluid froze last week and it took two days before it thawed and I could get it out of the system and refill it with the non freezing kind. I twas not fun with all that snow on the roads making the windows filthy.
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Old 12-04-2006, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tas
My windshield washer fluid froze last week and it took two days before it thawed and I could get it out of the system and refill it with the non freezing kind. I twas not fun with all that snow on the roads making the windows filthy.
Most windsheild washer fluids are only good for temps aboved freezing. ^32 degrees.

You need to switch to a Anti-Freeze windsheild washer fluid go for below freezing temps.

It's usually PINK in color.
I purchased some last week at Auto Zone for cheap.

If you have your Oil Change at a local dealer, remind them to put in the Anti-freeze washer fluid. Some of the dealers don't do that and you won't know it until your fluid freezes solid.
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Old 12-07-2006, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tas
My windshield washer fluid froze last week and it took two days before it thawed and I could get it out of the system and refill it with the non freezing kind. I twas not fun with all that snow on the roads making the windows filthy.
Ha, me too! I also had to take a lighter to my door key so that it would melt the ice in the lock!
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