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Old 10-18-2006, 12:08 AM
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Post *Water Storage* questions and answers

Emergencies: After dealing with medical emergencies, the next priority is your water supply. READ THIS

Water Storage Options

In most emergency situations, fresh drinking water is the most important item you can store. It is recommended to have both portable and stationary emergency water storage. Portable water containers should be light enough to carry during an emergency. Be sure to take into consideration that water weighs 8 lbs per gallon. Preparedness authorities recommend storing at least 14 gallons of water per person. This would mean a family of 4 would want to store approximately 56 gallons of water (remember to store both stationary/for washing and potable/for drinking). There are many types of containers and options available for storing water for long term.

Treat water with bleach before you use your water during an emergency. It is recommended to use 4 drops of bleach per quart of water.

Rotate your water once a year for freshness.


Water Storage Containers

Heavy-duty, thick, polyethylene food grade plastic barrels are great for water storage. These barrels are normally blue (color is important, blue means water is being stored, red would mean fuel or flammable liquid is being stored, and colors other than blue may not be food grade plastic) and normally come in sizes that range from 15 to 55 gallons. It is recommended to store these barrels in a dark and cool area, such as a basement or food storage room. Most barrels can be stored outside, although it is not the best place and it is recommended to take certain necessary precautions. During the winter you have to take into account the freezing factor. When water freezes it expands. If there is not enough room at the top of your barrel, it can cause your barrel to become disfigured or may even crack. It is recommended to only fill the barrel 9/10 the way full if you plan on storing it in a place that freezes. Storing your barrel outside could have an effect on the life of the barrel. It is not recommended to store any water container in direct or indirect sunlight.

One of the best water storage options is the metalized plastic bag in a boxed water kit. The metalized bag is filled with water and then placed in a cardboard box. The water is kept from light, limiting any bacteria or algae growth. These kits are great because they offer an easy to use and versatile portable water system. The boxes can double as a sanitation kit (emergency toilet) and a carrying case for transporting water.

A smaller version of the metalized water bag system is the water pouch of purified drinking water. Each pouch contains approximately four to eight ounces of water that can be stored for more than five years. This would be an alternative to heavier containers as a minimum ration for small children, but it would not be a viable water source in place of larger containers.

Two-liter pop, Gatorade or juice bottles are also a good option for inexpensive water storage. Be sure to clean them well and store in a cool and dark area. Light and warmth will promote algae and bacteria growth. Over time these water containers can breakdown and leak. It is recommended to not store them next to food or other items that can be damaged by water. Heavy containers should always be stored close to ground level and secured to prevent breakage or possible injury in the event of any earthquake or natural disaster. Be sure to store these water containers away from any harmful chemicals. It is not recommended to use milk jugs. These jugs are biodegradable and can break down within a short period of time.

Tips and Suggestions

Water can be found during an emergency from several different places around the house including the water heater, ice cubes in freezer, ice crystals on inside of freezer, and as a last resort, the reservoir tank in your toilet (not the bowl).

Water containers can be stored in many different places such as closets, underneath beds, etc. Hot tubs and swimming pools are possible water sources, although extreme precaution and education is recommended before using this option.
Glass containers are not recommended for water store because they can easily break during an emergency.
Available water filters and purifiers treat from 26 to as much as 60,000 gallons of water. These items are a must to have in addition to your portable and stationary water storage to insure water for your family.
If space and money is a concern, start small and gradually build your water storage as you build your food storage.

Your local authorities may also have some useful tips and suggestions.
Another important resource is the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).



Where to buy Water Storage containers:

Associated Foods in Utah - Macey's, Kent's, Lee's

Industrial Container & Supply - phone # is 801-972-1561. The address is 1865 S. 4490 W. City?
They will deliver it anywhere from Cache Valley to Nephi in Utah.

Donut Shops and Bakery - get free buckets from the local do-nut shop. It is the buckets that the filling comes in. The lids are snap on though, not screw on.

Quality Container - Utah 801-977-0770

Online -

shelfreliance.com
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  #2  
Old 11-01-2006, 10:52 PM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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What do you think of bottled water from the store or the water that you can buy at the store that are in the gallon containers similar to the milk gallon jugs?

I just don't know where to begin. I need to buy a big water container, but I figured that the smaller containers would be better to handle.

I've also seen people "can" water like they would for canning peaches etc.

Any recommendations for smaller containers? What do I already have at home that I could use?
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Old 11-01-2006, 11:38 PM
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The milk jug type containers are not meant for long term storage.
The smaller drinking bottles of water are okay for short term - keeping in mind that you need to rotate every 3-6 months and buy a fresh supply.

Long term storage is recommended in the heavy duty water barrels that will not let light penetrate the container. Algae thrives in a light source.

The key thing to remember is to at least store some type of water, it's better than not having anything at all.

Albertson's has clear blue colored gallon water bottles that are really nice. They were on sale last month for $1 each.

______________

You can store water for cleaning and sanitation purposes in rinsed out Liquid Laundry Detergent containers if it's easier. Do Not drink or cook with this water.
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Old 11-15-2006, 02:59 PM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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I have more questions...

You said I can store water (for cleaning) in used laundry detergent containers, do I still have to put the drops of bleach in? In other words, if I'm storing the water for non-drinking, do I need to use bleach?

What is the equivalent tsp for a drop? 8 drops per gallon, but how many tsps?

I've seen that you can buy individual water containers like caprisuns. What about using breast milk storage bags for water? They're designed for liquid and are pretty durable.
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Old 11-15-2006, 06:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wipersnaz
I have more questions...

You said I can store water (for cleaning) in used laundry detergent containers, do I still have to put the drops of bleach in? In other words, if I'm storing the water for non-drinking, do I need to use bleach?.
It doesn't hurt to put the 8 drops in the "cleaning water". Bleach is used to prevent Algae or Mold from growing inside the container. It also kills some bacteria that could make you very sick.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wipersnaz
What is the equivalent tsp for a drop? 8 drops per gallon, but how many tsps?.
60 drops = 1 tsp
30 drops= 1/2 tsp
15 drops = 1/4 tsp
7.5 drops= 1/8 tsp


Quote:
Originally Posted by wipersnaz
I've seen that you can buy individual water containers like caprisuns. What about using breast milk storage bags for water? They're designed for liquid and are pretty durable.
They are not recommended because they are "See Through or Clear".
If you store water for long periods of time, you will need to find containers that you CAN"T see through. If water is allowed to sit near a source of light, then the algae and mold will grow rapidly.


Good Questions!!
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Old 11-16-2006, 12:18 AM
wipersnaz wipersnaz is offline
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Thanks for your replies. One more silly question. What do you use for a dropper? I have a medicine dropper that I use for my kids, can I use something like that?
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Old 11-16-2006, 12:19 AM
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Medicine droppers are perfect!
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Old 01-16-2007, 04:00 PM
jontinas jontinas is offline
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We had a food storage specialist come and talk to our stake. He said that bleach is not good to put in water that you are going to drink. Bleach has dies, softeners and other ingredients besides clorine. He said it can do horrible things to your body. Still good for laundry and cleaning though. He suggested buying pure clorine 99%, the powder stuff you get at the pool supply store, it is pure and you only need 1 Tbsp. to every 55 gallon of water, then you let it sit for 24 hours and then you can test it with test strips you can also get at your pool suppy store, if it still is not pure then you put more clorine.

He said that you fill your water barrels and change them every year for taste but you do not have to put the clorine in the water to start if the water was from the tap to start with. Water doesn't go bad, it just starts to taste bad. If put in new containers. The clorine is for after your storage water is gone and you need to get water from other sorces that may not be pure.

I have 20 pages of notes on this prepardness meeting and I learned so much and would be happy to send it to anyone that is interested in it. Or I can also give you his name and phone number if you are interested in him coming and speaking in your stake.

He has had a lot of experience with disasters and has seen how things work first hand.

I hope I am not stepping on anyone's toes, just wanted to pass on what I have learned.

Tina
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Old 01-17-2007, 04:18 PM
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How much water we should have w/our 72 hr. kits?

How have you packed it with your stuff?
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Old 01-17-2007, 10:18 PM
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Wink Hope this answers some of your questions....

How much water we should have w/our 72 hr. kits?

How have you packed it with your stuff?


This is what a Rep. with FEMA suggested.

One gallon per day for an Adult in hot weather is adequate. That's equal to (8) 8 oz. glasses of water or 64 oz. for drinking and the other 64 oz. for washing hands or food prep. You won't use it all in most cases.

Small children will not require 1 gallon per day to drink.

If you store 1 gallon water containers (like you buy at Albies for $1) next to your 72 hr. kits and you can load them into your vehicle quickly during a crisis. FEMA suggests you do it that way if possible. It's not always practical to pack 4-5 gallon plastic water jugs in the trunk of a car, they can't fit into tight spaces like the 1 gallon jugs do.

The main thing is to have water on hand and easily portable. It would be nearly impossible to haul a 55 gallon barrel of water at a moments notice- it weighs 440 lbs. But it's not impossible to load 55 smaller containers into a car quickly if you had to.

This information comes from a friend of mine that is a member of our local Sheriff's Dept. and Search & Rescue squad -
To carry 3 gallons of water in an adult backpack is not going to work. Each gallon weighs about 8 lbs. It's best to pack (2) 16 oz. bottles and buy a water purification device sold at most camping supply places. One device will supply the whole family with fresh water for 72 hrs. and you can refill the empty 16 oz. bottles as needed. That's what most serious backpackers and mountain climbers do.
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